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#1 youngr

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 01:30 PM

I saw Jerred's blog about 51 health and fitness rules and I was surprised at one of them that said "don't drink skim milk." Can anyone give me some more information about why it's bad or about skim vs. other types of milk? 

 

Thanks,

Ross


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#2 JayFaber54

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 07:43 PM

Being born and raised on a dairy farm, I feel I have some insight into this topic. First what is "skim milk". Milk is classified by the butterfat percentage in the milk. 1% is 1% butterfat, 2% is 2% butterfat, and whole milk is 3.5% to 4%. Skim milk can have up to, but no more than, 0.2% butterfat. I think the reason that he says to not drink skim milk is that you may as well drink water. Aside from losing a lot of the benefits of drinking milk by drinking skim milk, it goes through a different process to be packaged. Since it is so low in butter fat percentage, often times they will add a condensed, powder milk substitute that has gone through a process to remove the fat. They add this so the milk actually has a milk taste and it adds the white color back to the milk. 

 

Other food for thought;

Rbst free and anti-biotic free milk. This is one of the biggest propaganda-filled topics going around the dairy industry today. In the state of Oregon there are currently zero dairies using Rbst or "growth hormone". Since it's such a hot topic, milk processing plants pay extra for milk not containing Rbst. Aside from the fact that nobody uses it, you have motivation and a benefit not to. Second ALL mil is ani-biotic free. A cow has to have a calf to start producing milk (duh) when this happens, just like women, the cows milk first contains natural anti-biotics that are meant to boost the calf's immune system. This milk is milked from the cow and fed to the calves. After a week or so, the milk is checked using a system that can detect a 1/1,00,000th part anti-biotic milk in non-anti-biotic milk. If the milk doesn't pass, it doesn't go in the tank. The entire milk tank is checked by the milk hauling company when they pick the milk up from the dairy. If they detect even that 1/1,000,000th part of anti-biotic in the tank, the entire tank is dumped down the drain. For my family we raise about 500 head of cows and our tank is 10,000 gallons. That's a huge deal to lose that much milk. Additionally, the second time it happens they take away your milk license and you can no longer sell milk. Once the hauler gets back to the plant the milk is checked a third time before it starts the homogenization and pasteurization process. Homogenization is a process that splits the fat particles so you don't have the cream lump together rise to the top of the milk. Pasteurization kills any bacteria and kills the vitamin D in the milk. This is why milk says "vitamin D added" it's re-added after this process. Anyway, then you buy it from the store.

 

I would highly recommend getting at least pasteurized milk. I personally drink non-homogenized whole milk. Non-homogenized isn't a huge deal to me, but I drink it before it can separates and if you shake the bottle it mixes together anyway. I just think the non-homogenized tastes creamier and I'm a huge advocate of whole milk for it's 8 different amino acids for building muscles, muscle recovery, and electrolytes for recovery. Plus calcium, vitamin D, b12, and phosphorus, etc.

 

Not a huge advocate of raw milk, however. It's made a bad name for the milk industry. Since it doesn't go through the pasteurization process, people can get sick from it, people have even died. Raw milk laws in Oregon say that you can't sell raw milk if you have over 3 cows, and only 2 of the 3 can be milking at a time. Also, it's ridiculous to spend $10+ a gallon for raw milk when it's exactly the same thing you buy in a store, except there may be some bacteria that wasn't killed.

 

Sorry for the extended post, I just like people to be well informed.


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#3 NLgaragegym

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 07:50 PM

Wow, great info.  Thanks man.



#4 youngr

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 12:45 AM

Great info! Thanks for sharing. 






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