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wod conditionning omob

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#1 XFITM

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 01:19 AM

Hello, 

 

I've been training for a couple of years. I used to be member of a box but for now on, I'll train at home.

 

I just started OMOB strength and EMOM but I would like to do a little bit of conditioning.

 

I've been looking for some explanation how to design a wod. Is it completely random or there is programming behind it. Because some WOD like chippers are longer and don't target the same energy system than shorter one. Some takes long break between small burst of energy, others don`t have break. Also if I do thruster one day, will it affect my squat or press the day after ? 

 

Should I target 1 energy system for a while and switch to another or do them equally along the week ? 

 

How could I integrate it with OMOB. My goal is only to be fit. 

 

It's difficult to follow a programming on the web because there's a lot of thing I can`t do. Ex: I can`t sprint in winter, I don`t have a rower, my ceiling is low, so no wallball or snatch ...

 

Is there good resources on the topic on the internet or is there someone that can explain it to me ? I'm a bit lost and have a lot of questions. It's a lot easier to find information on strength programming than on conditioning.

 

Thank you



#2 UKoldguy

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 09:47 PM

I have had the conversation with myself A LOT My best advice would be to buy Tactical barbell 2 Conditioning.

He explains lot about conditioning

Endurance = steady state cardio once or twice a week

Wods of all types

For Load

For time

For reps

2 to 3 times a week having a good mixture of each type, so just basicly mix it up. But it depends what type of training you want to do.

 

 

They all have their place

I did a squat, bench and pull up wod on Saturday and did Squat, bench and weighted pull ups on the following Monday. Had Sunday off to recover.

Listened to my body and knew i would be able to hit both in the short few days with out hurting my heavy lifts. Just be careful and mind full of what you are doing and as VidaMD would say " Listen to your body " in respect to recovery.

Im sure his belly or some body part talks to him in real life but i cant prove it just yet ..

Good luck and welcome aboard


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#3 Vector300

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Posted 03 February 2016 - 10:09 PM

I admit I don't "do X-fit" and as such I do NOT consider myself experienced enough to really go into detail on the subject however what I will add is my opinion on the matter.

One of my main apprehensions with WODs is the random approach to training. Yes, there may be a benefit to this (always prepared for whatever life throws at you and blah blah blah...) but I still believe that for 90% of trainees you have to have some sort of goal in mind. If you're new to training then doing a bunch of random movements is fine so you can experience different styles and methods of training however once you go beyond that you need to figure out what YOU want. Case and point - for my upcoming physical qual I've designed my conditioning/WODs to represent similar test conditions. I could just plug in any random WOD and that'll contribute to my "overall" fitness but it may not help me at being able to subdue another individual 2x+ my bodyweight and throw his a$$ around. Progression is key to all things and is ingrained in us as humans. Get stronger, get faster, increase your Vo2 Max, etc..

Being good at fitness is not a realistic goal. It's one of the reasons why your elite level X-fitters are substantially different than your average trainee at a local box. Most of the elites could easily go toe-to-toe in other respective sports (O-lifting, powerlifting, track and field, and so on) any day of the week and still place at the Games. They're not just proficient at being efficient, they're strong and fast and powerful overall. Find what you want to be good at or what your weakness is and forge it into iron.
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#4 XFITM

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 12:28 AM

Thanks UKoldguy. I read the review and the introduction of the book and it seems really a good read.

 

I will buy it. I think it's exactly what I'm looking for. How to train each energy system without doing random workout as crossfit seems to do.

 

Vector300: thats a little bit why I asked the question, I find crossfit a little random and I wanted to know how to program something less random for me. I know I have to do something more specific but I don't know how to design it and how to progress. 

 

 

The book seems interesting, I hope it'll not be like other book I read on the topic that simply throw a bunch of examples of wod.



#5 VidaMD

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 09:20 PM

V's exactly right.  What you see on TV is NOT Crossfit.  Disclaimer, I love Crossfit - BUT - it has it's downfalls.  To be strong and fit, like V said, progression is the key.  Getting fit is a matter of increase endurance and VO2 max, your body doesn't care how you do it as long as the stimulus is sufficient to force change.

 

Now - addressing UKOG - I have one specific part of my body that talks to me all the time.  The problem is in our society it is greatly frowned upon to listen to it!!!

 

Honestly, the Tactical training stuff looks pretty darn good.  Bounce over to the logs and see what some of the others are doing. 

 

So if you're really really lost, buy a program.  OMOB/Tactical/5/3/1 - whatever it is, plug in and stick to it for awhile.  You will get stronger and fitter - it's after they stop working when you need to step back and evaluate.  OMOB + EMOM + Conditioning is a great all around program if you don't know where to start.

 

Good luck


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#6 XFITM

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Posted 07 February 2016 - 11:37 PM

Thanks a lot UKOldguy.

 

Tactical Barbell Conditioning was what I was looking for, for years. It was really a good read. It explains a lot on which energy system to train and when. Not only random Wod like a lot of Crossfit workout. (I like Crossfit, but not every box I structured)

 

I started Block 1 today. After finishing it, I'm planning on doing Black with OMOB as Strength part. 

 

Did you also read Tactical Barbell 1 (Strength). Is it a good read compared to OMOB or should I stick with it ?



#7 UKoldguy

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 12:09 PM

Glad its helped you mate. No I went straight for tactical strength 2 which is also a good read. Pops and I are running ZULU from it and it seems like a good programming with lots of scope for conditioning.
My last word will probably be
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"Now, get off my lawn!" :angry:

#8 UKoldguy

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 12:12 PM

I will run ZULU for 2 cycles and then I may drop back to OMOB for a few cycles just to mixed it up a little. Both have their merits dude but until you run the.both you won't know which is best for your own needs but from what you have written so far I think OMOB with conditioning would be your best bet.
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My last word will probably be
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"Now, get off my lawn!" :angry:

#9 Pops

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Posted 08 February 2016 - 12:52 PM

Agree. Hard to beat OMOB. Also planning to run tb2 Zulu for 3 more weeks after this, deload 1 week then start OMOB again.
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#10 texasjmd

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 04:11 PM

Conditioning is where I really struggle. Trying to figure out how much and when to fit in metabolic conditioning (WOD), sprints, and aerobic conditioning is driving me crazy. I would rather have a program that says on this day, do this. That's the drawback to OMOB. Gives too mich freedom in my opinion. To me the barbell programmer is not very effective.

#11 danduerksen

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 04:46 PM

Conditioning is where I really struggle. Trying to figure out how much and when to fit in metabolic conditioning (WOD), sprints, and aerobic conditioning is driving me crazy. I would rather have a program that says on this day, do this. That's the drawback to OMOB. Gives too mich freedom in my opinion. To me the barbell programmer is not very effective.

I haven't gotten the hang of the barbell programmer either. It's a nice tool, just not what I'm looking for. But honestly my conditioning has been largely deficient since I've started playing with omob. I still believe that the end of three programing gives the best opportunity to blend in more conditioning when compared to other strength programs. I really enjoyed the 1 Barbell Blaze program because it mixed strength and conditioning and laid out exactly what you were expected to do on each day. If you want to run omob and work in more conditioning it requires a little extra planning. Get a scheduler and write in your omob days and the days you want to concentrate on conditioning. There's the hidden wod page you can get to with the link below. Or you can find another wod generator to use for your conditioning days. Or choose to run/row instead of trying to find a wod you like. I'm going to be doing this same thing for the next month so I know it can be challenging.

 

http://members.endof...d892ba32ca8feae


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#12 texasjmd

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 10:41 PM

I haven't gotten the hang of the barbell programmer either. It's a nice tool, just not what I'm looking for. But honestly my conditioning has been largely deficient since I've started playing with omob. I still believe that the end of three programing gives the best opportunity to blend in more conditioning when compared to other strength programs. I really enjoyed the 1 Barbell Blaze program because it mixed strength and conditioning and laid out exactly what you were expected to do on each day. If you want to run omob and work in more conditioning it requires a little extra planning. Get a scheduler and write in your omob days and the days you want to concentrate on conditioning. There's the hidden wod page you can get to with the link below. Or you can find another wod generator to use for your conditioning days. Or choose to run/row instead of trying to find a wod you like. I'm going to be doing this same thing for the next month so I know it can be challenging.

 

http://members.endof...d892ba32ca8feae

Thanks for the link.  I had forgotten about it, though its a crap shoot if the WOD will complement your OMOB work. The hard part is figuring out the right balance of WODs, sprints, running/rowing aerobic pace, etc to mix in. 



#13 danduerksen

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 03:48 PM

I don't think there's a magic formula. I've never been able to find anything. Especially for us regular folk. You have to take a look at your goals and decide what the right balance should be to achieve them. If you just want to be well rounded with no specific goal you could find a running/rowing program and run it alternating days with omob. If you want to add a conditioning wod on you omob days you could browse through wodwell and pick out a few that you rotate through. Don't think there's a wrong way to do it. Just have to make sure you're recovering sufficiently enough that you don't undermine all the work you're putting in.


"He who wants to succeed should learn how to fight, to strive and to suffer. You can acquire a lot in life if you are prepared to give up a lot to get it."

 

Practice the basics as if they were advanced. That's the key to advancing


#14 Virtus

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 11:19 PM

The KISS method is your friend. Crossfit style metcons can be fun but they can absolutely hamper your OMOB work if you don't program them right. After recently starting a running program again I don't think there is much that can improve conditioning faster. Throw in a sprint workout, run some hills, and work up to a steady 3-6 mile "long" run and you will hit all of the major energy systems. Rowing would also be a good substitute; don't over think it.

I would also highly recommend Tactical Barbell Conditioning to get you started.
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#15 danduerksen

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Posted 30 August 2017 - 12:11 AM

The KISS method is your friend. Crossfit style metcons can be fun but they can absolutely hamper your OMOB work if you don't program them right. After recently starting a running program again I don't think there is much that can improve conditioning faster. Throw in a sprint workout, run some hills, and work up to a steady 3-6 mile "long" run and you will hit all of the major energy systems. Rowing would also be a good substitute; don't over think it.

I would also highly recommend Tactical Barbell Conditioning to get you started.

Had to look up this KISS method... duh :wacko:  I'll second the running. Best and easiest way to condition no matter what anyone tells you.


"He who wants to succeed should learn how to fight, to strive and to suffer. You can acquire a lot in life if you are prepared to give up a lot to get it."

 

Practice the basics as if they were advanced. That's the key to advancing


#16 Hillside Honey Badger

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 02:39 PM

Conditioning is where I really struggle. Trying to figure out how much and when to fit in metabolic conditioning (WOD), sprints, and aerobic conditioning is driving me crazy. I would rather have a program that says on this day, do this. That's the drawback to OMOB. Gives too mich freedom in my opinion. To me the barbell programmer is not very effective.


Late to the party, but thought I would give my opinion as I went through the same frustration. I had spent way too much time copying WODs out and trying to work out where they could fit into my training plan. Without having the real knowledge to programme these all properly, I just ended up with a random selection of WODs that although they would smoke me I wasn't really sure how to fit them into my plan, and how beneficial it would actually be. Similar to the Barbell Programmer - I can see that these methods would be useful, but it's all a bit too random for me, and I struggled to get my head round it all.

As the guys said above, it depends what your goals are, but I would highly recommend 'Tactical Barbell 2: conditioning'. It really helped me simplify & understand the different types of conditioning, and how best to use them etc. After reading the book I've ended up with 3 TB2 conditioning sessions that I'll start using alongside OMOB, and I've got a few others up my sleeve from the book and also the logs on this forum that I'll substitute in from time to time, or do for "fun" when time permits. There are almost 50 examples of conditoning sessions, so plenty to keep you occupied if you need more variety.
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